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June 19, 2015

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

CONTACT:
Tas Smith (478) 474-0679, ext. 5404; tasmith@gfb.org

 

GEORGIA FARM BUREAU PRAISES HOUSE PASSAGE OF TRADE PROMOTION AUTHORITY

 

MACON, Ga. – Georgia Farm Bureau President Zippy Duvall applauded the U.S. House of Representatives for passing on June 18 the Bipartisan Trade Priorities and Accountability Act of 2015 (H.R.2146), which would give the office of the president trade promotion authority (TPA). The legislation now moves to the Senate for consideration. If passed, TPA will give the president authority to enter and finalize free trade agreements subject to Congressional approval. Congress has granted TPA to every president since 1974, with the most recent law being approved in August 2002 and expiring June 30, 2007.

 

“For Georgia agriculture to continue to compete globally, impediments to international trade must be eliminated,” Duvall said. “The House’s passage of TPA brings us closer to completing ambitious trade negotiations around the world. TPA streamlines negotiations and strengthens our position at the bargaining table.”

 

Duvall expressed appreciation for the support of Georgia House members who voted for the legislation.

 

“Georgia Farm Bureau thanks Congressmen Buddy Carter, Tom Price, Austin Scott, Rob Woodall, Jody Hice, Barry Loudermilk, Rick Allen, and Tom Graves for their support of TPA on the House floor and their commitment to moving trade forward.”

 

In 2013, Georgia exported nearly $3 billion in agriculture products up from $1.8 billion in 2009, according to the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service. Georgia exports help boost farm prices and income, while supporting about 22,500 jobs, both on the farm and in related industries such as food processing, transportation, and manufacturing according to the USDA. Nationwide, U.S. food and agriculture exports reached a record $150.5 billion in 2014, supporting more than one million American jobs.

 

Georgia Farm Bureau is the state’s largest general farm organization and has 158 county offices. Its volunteer members actively participate in local, state and national activities that promote agriculture awareness to their non-farming neighbors. GFB also has 20 agricultural commodity advisory committees that give the organization input on issues pertinent to the major crops and livestock grown in Georgia.

 

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